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REQUIEM

Below are the two final essays to be posted on Allegiance and Duty Betrayed. The first one is written by a friend -- screen name 'Euro-American Scum' -- who, over the past four years, has been the most faithful essayist here. He has written about everything from his pilgrimage to Normandy in 2004 to take part in the 60th–year commemoration of the invasion, to his memories of his tour in Vietnam. His dedication to America’s founding principles ... and those who have sacrificed to preserve them over the past 200+ years ... is unequaled. Thank you, E-A-S. It has been a privilege to include your writing here, and it is a privilege to call you my friend.

The second essay is my own farewell. And with it I thank all of the many regular visitors, and those who may have only dropped in occasionally, for coming here. I hope you learned something. I hope a seed or two was planted. But, even if not, I thank you for stopping by ... 25 March, 2010

7/20/2007

Hmmmm ...

Hatshepsut.jpg

News from the desiccated, dusty world of Egyptology:

A mummy from a tomb discovered over a century ago in Upper Egypt has been identified as that of Hatshepsut, one of the earliest female rulers known to history.

Hatshepsut’s regnal dates were 1479 to 1458 B.C.

Born a princess, she married her half-brother, who subsequently became pharaoh as Thutmose II. When that monarch died, leaving only an infant son, Hatshepsut took power as regent.

Six years later she was sufficiently confident to have herself crowned as pharaoh, wearing a false beard for the purpose.

She ran a vigorous administration, though there has been some scandalized muttering in Egyptological circles about her relationship with Senenmut, the royal steward.

Plainly this was a formidable lady.

Some papyrus scrolls covered with hieroglyphics found near Hatshepsut’s sarcophagus have not yet been fully deciphered, but appear to be the billing records of a law firm …

(National Review, 7/30/07)

12 comments:

robmaroni said...

ROTFLMAO!

3timesalady said...

I'm "ROTFLMAO" too. ;)

Anonymous said...

Bwahahahahahaha!

DaveBurkett said...

I was wondering "what the hell?" until I got to the last sentence. {G}

john galt said...

Looks like National Review developed a sense of humor after Buckley retired. ;)

Anonymous said...

Who said there's no such thing as reincarnation?

John Cooper said...

Tut, tut...

calbrindisi said...

LOL! (at the article and Cooper's answer!)

Anonymous said...

I wonder if Hatshe wore pantsuits?

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the belly laugh!

smithy said...

Thanks, I needed that! ;)

Anonymous said...

Very funny, and I didn't know it was until the last sentence. :)